Consumer FAQs

Consumer FAQs

What is radon?

Radon is a radioactive gas that has been found in homes all over the United States. It comes from the natural breakdown of uranium in soil, rock, and water and gets into the air you breathe. Radon typically moves up through the ground to the air above and into your home through cracks and other holes in the foundation. Radon can also enter your home through well water. Your home can trap radon inside.

Radon is a cancer-causing natural radioactive gas that you can’t see, smell or taste. Its presence in your home can pose a danger to your family’s health. Radon is the leading cause of lung cancer among non-smokers. Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in America and it is estimated that 21,000 lung cancer deaths annually are related to radon. Test your home for Radon. Consider fixing your home if you have radon levels between 2 and 4 pCi/L

Are New Or Old Homes More Susceptible To Radon?

Any home can have a radon problem. This means new and old homes, well-sealed and drafty homes and homes with or without basements. In fact, you and your family are most likely to get your greatest radiation exposure at home. That is where you spend most of your time.

Nearly one out of every 15 homes in the United States is estimated to have an elevated radon level (4pCi/L or more).

Who can test my home for radon?

Hiring a professional certified by the NRSB is a good way to ensure that your testing is done correctly. You can search our database to find professionals in your area. There are Radon Measurement Specialists (RMS) and Radon Measurement Technicians (RMT). You can also test your home yourself by contacting one of our Accredited Radon Laboratories (ARL).

If the levels of radon are elevated and need to be mitigated, please search for our Radon Mitigation Specialist (RRS).

Some states have regulations regarding licensing and certification. Please check the EPA website at https://www.epa.gov/radon/find-information-about-local-radon-zones-and-state-contact-information to find your state radon contact and detailed information.

Who can fix my home for radon?

If the levels of radon are elevated and need to be mitigated, please search for our Radon Mitigation Specialist (RRS).

Some states have regulations regarding licensing and certification. Please check the EPA website at https://www.epa.gov/radon/find-information-about-local-radon-zones-and-state-contact-information to find your state radon contact and detailed information.